The ulimit Command





The ulimit Command

The ulimit command manipulates system resource limits for current and child processes using the following format:

ulimit [options] 

or

ulimit [options] n 

where n indicates to set a resource limit to n (except with the –a option). If n is not given, the specified resource limit is displayed. If no option is given, the default –f (file size limit) is used. Here, all the current resource limits are displayed:

$ ulimit —a 
time(seconds)    unlimited 
memory(kbytes)   unlimited 
data(kbytes)     4294901761 
stack(kbytes)    2048 
file(blocks)     unlimited 
coredump(blocks) unlimited 

This command sets the core dump size limit to 500 blocks:

$ ulimit —c 500 

To disable generation of core dumps, the dump size should be set to 0 blocks:

$ ulimit —c 0 

To display the current file size write limit, use ulimit without arguments:

$ ulimit 
unlimited 

Figure lists the ulimit options. If a size argument is not given, the current limit is displayed.

Figure ulimit Options

–a

displays all the current resource limits

–c n

set the core dump size limit to n 512-byte blocks

–d n

set the data area size limit to n kilobytes

–f n

set the child process file write limit to n 512-byte blocks (default)

–m n

set the physical memory size limit to n kilobytes

–s n

set the stack area size limit to n kilobytes

–t n

set the process time limit to n seconds

The ulimit command is system dependent. Some systems may have different resource limits, and some may not allow changing resource limits. Check your local system documentation for discrepancies.



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