39 Manually Recreate a Damaged WINS Database





Manually Recreate a Damaged WINS Database

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A corrupt WINS database can spell a host of problems and must be repaired if your network is to function properly. This hack shows you how to recreate a damaged WINS database.

If you're still using WINS on your network—typically in a mixed NT/2000 or NT/2003 environment while migration is underway—you might occasionally experience corruption of the Windows Internet Name Service (WINS) database. If your WINS database becomes corrupted, you can experience all manner of problems with your workstations and servers—most notably, name-resolution problems for legacy Windows clients. You'll need to fix your WINS database if these clients are to communicate on the network. This hack recreates a damaged Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 WINS database.

Windows NT 4.0

To recreate a damaged WINS database on Windows NT, first go to Control PanelServices and stop the Windows Internet Name Service. Then, create a folder named WINS_OLD and move the contents of the %SystemRoot%\System32\WINS folder to WINS_OLD. Finally, restart the Windows Internet Name Service. When you are positive that the new WINS database is functioning properly, delete the WINS_OLD directory.

Windows Server 2000/2003

To recreate a damaged WINS database on Windows Sever 2000/2003, first go to Control Panel Administrative ToolsServices and stop the Windows Internet Name Service. Then, create a folder named WINS_OLD and move the contents of the %SystemRoot%\System32\WINS folder to WINS_OLD. Finally, restart the Windows Internet Name Service. When you are positive that the new WINS database is functioning properly, delete the WINS_OLD directory.

The only difference between Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 for recreating a WINS database is the location for accessing the services.


Again, when you are positive that the new WINS database is functioning properly, delete the WINS_OLD directory.

Rod Trent


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